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Pupil Premium

Pupil Premium

 

The pupil premium is additional funding given to schools to raise the attainment of disadvantaged pupils and close the gap between them and their peers. The Government believes that the pupil premium is the best way to address current underlying inequalities between children eligible for free school meals (FSM) and their non FSM peers, by ensuring the funding to tackle disadvantage reaches the pupils who need it most. The Government uses eligibility for free school meals as the main measure of deprivation at pupil level.

 

Common barriers for disadvantaged pupils can be; weak language and communication skills, lack of confidence, more frequent behavioural difficulties, attendance and punctuality issues and less support at home. The challenges are complex and varied, therefore, it is important that individual needs are identified and catered for as we are very clear that negative, outside influences are not an excuse for underachievement.

 

At St Mary’s and St Benedict’s school, there is a school-wide commitment to raising achievement for ALL pupils and a key objective for the use of the pupil premium grant is to close the gap between pupil groups.

 

Aims

  • To close the attainment gap in Reading, Writing and Maths
  • To continue to improve behavioural difficulties at school and/or home which are impacting on individuals accessing the curriculum
  • To continue to improve confidence, anxiety/anger issues, self-esteem and independence
  • To continue to improve attendance and punctuality
  • To continue to develop parental engagement, support and partnership work to remove barriers to learning
  • For ALL pupils to achieve the highest possible standards and realise their full potential in all aspects of their learning

 

2016/2017

In 2016/2017, the school has received £89,320 in pupil premium.

 

Barriers to future attainment:

  • Behavioural difficulties preventing individuals from accessing the curriculum
  • Individual family circumstances leading to anxiety, anger or low self-esteem
  • Low attendance for a small minority of pupils
  • Engagement of some parents in supporting the education of their child
  • Socio-economic influences on the family

 

How we will spend the pupil premium money to address these barriers:

  • Employ additional teaching assistants to provide 1:1 support to children that have difficulties accessing the curriculum because of their behaviour. These staff will liaise with outreach services to ensure that they are supported in their use of strategies and resources to fully support individual pupils access the curriculum at their level.
  • Employ additional teaching assistants to deliver personalised intervention programmes. This additional support is clearly identified in provision maps and intervention timetables and regularly monitored and evaluated by senior leaders. The aim is to narrow the gap between FSM and non-FSM pupils and ensure that FSM children make at least expected progress.
  • Provide additional time for the SENCO to develop provision maps and/or monitor and evaluate impact
  • Retain the IDL Dyslexic Programme and teaching assistant time to implement the programme so that we can effectively support pupils with FSM/dyslexia
  • Provide ‘Booster Classes’ for pupils in Year 6 who have been identified as falling behind
  • Use administrative hours to flag up those pupils, to senior leaders and parents, whose punctuality or attendance is a concern and impacting on their education
  • Employ a CARITAS worker to: work with parents and families to support their children through difficulties such as bereavement or family separation, provide nurturing and support sessions for children 1:1 or in small groups, to work with children and their families to help improve behaviour at home and/or school, to work with children to build positive relationships, to provide home visits to families to help them support their children through difficulties, accessing Christmas gifts for families that cannot afford to buy them themselves and to deliver workshops such as NSPCC PANTS and RELAX KIDS

 

How we will measure the impact:

  • Termly analysis of data
  • Monitoring and evaluating intervention timetables and provision maps
  • TA diagnostic tests
  • Pupil Progress meetings to discuss FSM and target children. Next steps for learning reviewed in these meetings
  • Attendance triggers and attendance paper work
  • Analysis of data from the IDL Programme
  • Regular meetings and reviews with the CARITAS worker
  • Attendance at sports and additional activities monitored

 

2015/2016

In 2015/2016, the school received £89,920 in pupil premium. The premium was used in the following ways:

 

  • To provide 2 teaching assistants in the Foundation Stage unit alongside 2 teachers giving a ratio of 1:11 or 1:12. This allowed for timely intervention and targeted support to accelerate progress and give the children in Reception class the best start to their education
  • To acquire the IDL Dyslexic Programme and teaching assistant time to implement the programme so that we can effectively support pupils with FSM/dyslexia
  • Use administrative hours to flag up those pupils, to senior leaders and parents, whose punctuality or attendance is a concern and impacting on their education
  • Employ additional teaching assistants to deliver personalised intervention programmes. This additional support is clearly identified in provision maps and intervention timetables and regularly monitored and evaluated by senior leaders. The aim is to narrow the gap between FSM and non-FSM pupils and ensure that FSM children make at least expected progress
  • Provide ‘Booster’ classes for pupils in Year 6 that were identified as falling behind
  • Employ a CARITAS worker to: work with parents and families to support their children through difficulties such as bereavement or family separation, provide nurturing and support sessions for children 1:1 or in small groups, to work with children and their families to help improve behaviour at home and/or school, to work with children to build positive relationships, to provide home visits to families to help them support their children through difficulties and to deliver workshops such as NSPCC PANTS and RELAX KIDS

 

Examples of impact in 2015/2016 include:

  • The majority of the children participating in the IDL Dyslexia Programme made progress compared to their starting points on the programme
  • The CARITAS worker provided emotional support to a number of children and their families who were experiencing difficult situations, she provided behavioural support to a number of children and their families leading to positive outcomes in school and/or at home, acted as mediator for families in conflict and provided ‘coping strategies’ to a number of pupils who were able to access the curriculum more fully than when she began working with them
  • Children benefitted from high quality individual or small group support delivered by teaching assistants to enable them to accelerate their progress and make at least expected progress
  • Intervention timetables and provision maps evidence where timely support has been put in place to ‘narrow the gap’
  • Children eligible for FSM attendance improved from 94% in 2014 to 96% in 2015 narrowing the gap from 3% to 1%.
  • In Reception, the percentage of children achieving a ‘Good Level of Development’ increased from 62% in 2015 to 64% in 2016 (moving closer to the national figure of 69% in 2016) and 50% of those children eligible for FSM achieved a ‘Good Level of Development’ broadly in line with the national figure of 54%, 87% of the children eligible for FSM made better than expected progress
  • In Year 1, 84% of children passed the Phonics Screening Check above the national average of 81%. 75% of children eligible for FSM passed the Phonics Screening Check above the national average 69%
  • In KS1, 71% of all children achieved expected standard in Reading and 67% of children eligible for FSM achieved expected standard in Reading (national 74%), 71% of all children achieved expected standard in Writing and 67% of children eligible for FSM achieved expected standard in Writing (national 65%), in Maths 78% of all children achieved expected standard and 67% of children eligible for FSM achieved expected standard in Maths (national 73%)
  • In KS2, 65% of all children achieved expected standard in Reading, Writing and Maths and 55% of children eligible for FSM achieved expected standard in Reading, Writing and Maths (national 53%), 74% of all children achieved expected standard in Reading and 67% of children eligible for FSM achieved expected standard for Reading (national 66%), 88% of all children achieved expected standard in Grammar and 82% of children eligible for FSM achieved expected standard for Grammar (national 72%), 81% of all children achieved expected standard in Maths and 82% of children eligible for FSM achieved expected standard (national 70%), 79% of all children achieved expected standard in Writing and 64% of children eligible for FSM achieved expected standard in Writing (national 74%)
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